Our Southern Utah Adventure

Our southern Utah adventure started with a couple of days spent in the southeastern part of the state. Probably the most well known place to visit there is Monument Valley but, given our time constraints, we had to save that for another time. I had seen pictures of the twisting, entrenched river meander visible from an overlook at Goosenecks State Park and that was an easily accessible stop to make after our day of driving from Albuquerque.

We also had enough time to drive down the road to Mexican Hat and then take the side road to a good view of the formation that gives the town its name.

Friday was the day set aside for hiking. With all of the options available it wasn’t easy to select one, knowing what we would have to pass up. The weather helped us make a decision. Deserts and mesas would be too hot so we headed to the mountains.

Not far from Blanding, several access roads lead into the Manti-La Sal National Forest, close to the controversial Bears Ears formation. We thought we had picked an isolated area for our hike, but after driving a winding dirt road up the mountains to the trailhead we were surprised to find a large group of people setting up booths and tents. We had stumbled upon the Annual Summer Gathering of the Native peoples who have ancestral ties to the Bears Ears region. It was interesting to talk to them and get an understanding of the issues involved.

The first hike we attempted was on a trail so overgrown that, even after several times backtracking, we never found what we thought would be a trail into Kigalia Canyon. We drove further up the road and had better luck finding a couple of other trails that lead into Hammond Canyon. But by then we didn’t have enough time to go too far into the canyon.

Spring in Kigalia Canyon
Hammond Canyon
View of Bears Ears formation on drive back from hiking

As we left Blanding on Friday, heading to Cedar City in southwestern Utah, we drove the loop road through Natural Bridges National Monument. At the stop for the last of the three Bridges we walked the trail that led under the impressive stone structure.

Sipapu Bridge at Natural Bridges.

By lunchtime we were driving through Capital Reefs National Park. We ate at the picnic area near the Visitors Center and stopped for a couple of scenic viewpoints but then it was time to get back on the road.

Capital Reefs National Park.

The main attraction for our week in Utah awaited us in Cedar City. We had five days to spend enjoying hiking (me and Lee) and biking (Aaron and Ruth) trails. Not to mention just the fun of being together for the week.

We found time to visit Cedar Breaks National Monument, Zion National Park, and several areas in the Dixie National Forest.

One of the overlooks on our hike at Cedar Breaks.
I was amazed at the size and abundance of Bristlecone Pine trees.
A hike at Northgate Peaks in the northern section of Zion.
Hike in Kolob Canyons area, also in northern section of Zion.
Overlook that we hiked to in Pine Valley section of Dixie National Forest.
One of my favorite rock formations–reminds me of ET.
Cascade Falls Trail in Dixie National Forest.
Looking towards Zion from Virgin River Rim Trail.

Today as we head back to New Mexico we will make one more stop at another of the southern Utah wonders we have always wanted to visit–Bryce Canyon National Park.

Author: bjregan

Enjoying retirement activities. Main goals for retirement are to stay spiritually, physically, mentally and emotionally healthy.

4 thoughts on “Our Southern Utah Adventure”

  1. Such a truly great time, as always, we had spending the week with you and Lee. Thank you so much for sharing your stories, pictures, and time with Ruth and I. We wouldn’t change a single minute of our time with you guys.

Leave a Reply to 73parkavenue Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s